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January 31, 2019

Meet Them Where They Are

David Reidmiller is the director of the National Climate Assessment and previously led much of the U.S. government’s engagement in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change while at the State Department. He writes this in his personal capacity; the contents herein do not necessarily represent the views of the federal government. When working at the intersection of science and policy, scientists can find themselves shifting from the familiar–straightforward communication of …

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January 18, 2019

Promoting Science-based Policy 

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting 2018. By: Emilie Sinkler, a PhD candidate in Galciology at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. What can scientists (and non-scientists) do to preserve science funding and promote science-based policy? The 2018 AGU Fall Meeting was the perfect place to learn about and get involved in science policy. The location in the nation’s capital gave scientists …

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January 10, 2019

What is the Value of the Geosciences?

Photo Credit:Eos.org

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting 2018. By: Emilie Sinkler, a PhD candidate in Galciology at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Geoscientists study many different aspects of the world around us, under us, and above us. Knowledge about our world informs how and where we build our homes, streets, and other infrastructure. It also causes us to reconsider our actions and …

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January 4, 2019

Making Climate Change Personal

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting 2018. By: Haley Ritger, a PhD student at the University of Georgia. Haley holds master’s degrees in public affairs and environmental science from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs. As 28,500 registrants gather to present and discuss 8,000 papers at this year’s Fall Meeting and simultaneously kick-off the year-long AGU Centennial Celebration, we …

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December 20, 2018

What does it mean for Science to “stand for” something? 

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting 2018. By: Hannah Mark, MIT-WHOI Joint Program on Marine Geology and Geophysics At this year’s AGU Fall Meeting, I spent a good bit of time walking back and forth between posters and talks along the corridor on the lower level of the Walter Washington Convention Center. Every trip took me past a giant screen playing …

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December 7, 2018

Science Communication and Policy Events at Fall Meeting

By Shane M Hanlon and Brittany Webster In a world where most people cannot name a living scientist and science has been increasingly politicized, it’s important for scientists to be able to connect their science with society. This year at Fall Meeting, AGU is excited to have spaces dedicated to both science communication and outreach, as well as science policy, that will help you connect science to general non-scientists, journalists, …

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December 4, 2018

Science, Advocacy, and the Law at the Fall Meeting

Editor’s Note: The following guest blog is written by Rebecca Fowler, Communications Director of the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund. A growing number of geoscientists are engaging in advocacy and activism, and realizing that legal literacy is essential when science is in political crosshairs. Several offerings at the Fall Meeting will arm scientists with the knowledge they need to safely and effectively speak up for science in various settings. These include …

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November 9, 2018

Midterms and Science: The Results Are In… Sort Of

Last week, we covered three close races in California, Florida, and Texas that had major implications for leadership in science-related committees. Though two of the races we discussed have not been officially called yet as of Friday afternoon, speculation for who will win the committee leadership positions has already begun.   Culberson loses to Fletcher in Texas In a big upset for Republicans, Rep. John Culberson lost his reelection campaign …

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November 8, 2018

Scientists Go to Congress

This year, a record number of STEM professionals ran for Congress. 314 Action, a nonprofit political action committee, endorsed 13 first-time STEM candidates. Here are the 8 candidates that won:   Jacky Rosen – Nevada Senate Nevada’s Democratic Senator-elect Jacky Rosen is no stranger to Capital Hill. She is currently the Representative for Nevada’s 3rd district and sits on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Rosen has a …

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November 1, 2018

Midterms and Science: TX-07

Midterms are just around the corner! There are an overwhelming number of critical races, so this week we will highlight a few that have major implications for science – mainly shake-ups in committee leadership. Read Monday’s post on CA-48 and Tuesday’s post on the Florida Senate. Don’t forget to vote on 6 November! See if you’re registered here, and find your polling location here.   Texas’ 7th  Today we’ll be …

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