August 24, 2016

Q&A with Dr. Maria T. Zuber

Q&A with Dr. Maria T. Zuber

Did you know? Women’s Equality Day is August 26th! To celebrate, AGU will be featuring several female scientists on social media throughout the week. We’ll be posting Q&A’s on The Bridge, asking geoscientists about career advice, the work they do, and why it’s important to get involved in science policy. Today’s featured scientist is Dr. Maria T. Zuber. Dr. Maria T. Zuber is the Vice President for Research and E.A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute …

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August 22, 2016

Q&A with Dr. Ellen Stofan, Chief Scientist at NASA

Q&A with Dr. Ellen Stofan, Chief Scientist at NASA

Did you know? Women’s Equality Day is August 26th! To celebrate, AGU will be featuring several female scientists on social media throughout the week. We’ll be posting Q&A’s on The Bridge, asking geoscientists about career advice, the work they do, and why it’s important to get involved in science policy. Today’s featured scientist is Dr. Ellen Stofan. Dr. Stofan is the Chief Scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in Geological Sciences …

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August 18, 2016

Science Policy and the “Third Parties”

Gov. Gary Johnson

By George Marino, AGU Science Policy Intern I recently received a response to an article I shared on our Twitter account about the science policy positions of the Presidential candidates from the two major U.S. political parties. The person asked where a candidate from one of the other parties stood on the issues. So after some research, I can present the facts that I could find on what “third party” …

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August 2, 2016

Looking for Something Fun (and Good for the Earth Sciences) to Do This Summer?

Looking for Something Fun (and Good for the Earth Sciences) to Do This Summer?

John W. Geissman is a Professor Emeritus in Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico Welcome! The title of this blog is not meant to imply that you are bored, or already finished the five papers you intended to write this summer, or already took your one-day summer vacation. Rather, the purpose of this post is to highlight a great opportunity. Now is the perfect time to …

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June 17, 2016

Funding Season is Open: Part 4

Funding Season is Open: Part 4

Welcome back to our series on the federal funding process for science in FY2017! In this edition, we’ll be focusing on both the House and Senate Interior and Environment Appropriations bills. The House approved its version of the bill on Wednesday 15 June, and the Senate approved its version the following day. The Interior and Environment bill funds several environmental programs and agencies, such as the United States Fish and Wildlife …

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June 14, 2016

Congressman’s idea to privatize NWS forecasts gets icy reception among broadcast meteorologists.

Congressman’s idea to privatize NWS forecasts gets icy reception among broadcast meteorologists.

By Dan Satterfield I’m hearing a lot of talk among my fellow forecasters about legislation (introduced by an Oklahoma congressman) that would privatize many forecast functions of the NWS. You might think that private sector meteorologists would support this, but almost every broadcast metr. I know has panned the idea. The quality of public weather forecasts is due to the cooperation between the public and private sector, and a survey of …

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June 10, 2016

Space Weather Research and Forecasting Act Introduced to Senate

Space Weather Research and Forecasting Act Introduced to Senate

This blog post was written by Delores Knipp, Editor in Chief of AGU’s Space Weather and Space Weather Quarterly. To learn more about space weather, read Dr. Knipp’s previous post on the National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan. Space weather effects on technology-enabled societies were first reported in telegraph systems in the late 1840’s, with the Carrington storm of 1859 being a prime example. Furthermore, technologies developed within the last …

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May 31, 2016

Geoscience research essential to national security, experts say

Geoscience research essential to national security, experts say

By Lauren Lipuma WASHINGTON, DC — Government investment in basic science research is critical to protecting U.S. national security, according to a group of government and academic researchers. Basic geoscience research has helped the U.S. develop nuclear weapons experts, protect satellites from space weather and manage critical water supplies, scientists said during a recent congressional briefing on Capitol Hill. The May 12 briefing highlighted national security as an important, but …

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May 25, 2016

Funding Season is Open: Part 3

Funding Season is Open: Part 3

Thanks for staying with us as we continue to break down federal science funding for fiscal year 2017 (FY2017). To completely understand how the FY2017 landscape is evolving, I encourage you to check out the first and second parts of our funding Bridge posts. As you’ll recall, we previously laid out the good and bad of the Senate’s appropriations bill covering NASA, DOE’s Office of Science, NOAA, and the National …

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May 13, 2016

CASE in Point

CASE in Point

by Sarah Beganskas It’s 9:30 in the morning, and after a lovely 45-minute walk to Capitol Hill, I find myself standing outside Representative Sam Farr’s office door. Though the balmy weather is indistinguishable from that of my home in Santa Cruz, I feel worlds away. What will happen on the other side of that door? As a scientist who spends time in the field, I know that when I apply …

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