January 5, 2016

Science Communication, All Communication

Science Communication, All Communication

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Lindsay Barbieri, PhD Student, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of Vermont At this year’s AGU Fall Meeting, I attended a session on “The Many Sides of Sharing Science: A How To,” which covered a wide variety of approaches to science communication. From children reviewing science papers, to comic book conventions, to …

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December 31, 2015

Communicating Science Means Saving Lives

Communicating Science Means Saving Lives

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Emmanuel “Soli” Garcia, University of California San Diego   My recollection of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991 is dim in quite a literal sense. I may not recall much from my early childhood, but I still have memories of how ash fell on my neighborhood in Manila just under 60 miles away. As dark …

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December 30, 2015

“What Happens in the Arctic, Doesn’t Stay in the Arctic”

“What Happens in the Arctic, Doesn’t Stay in the Arctic”

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Andrés Sánchez, National Autonomous University of Mexico   At AGU’s Fall Meeting this year I attended a session on “Exploring the Role of Arctic Science in Developing International Arctic Policy”. The session gave way to a very interesting morning, with people from all over the world and different points of view working towards the same …

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December 29, 2015

Art and Emotions Can Unify Us – How About Science and Humanity?

Art and Emotions Can Unify Us - How About Science and Humanity?

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Azie Sophia Aziz, PhD student in geophysics at the Earth and Atmospheric Sciences University of Houston, Texas. “Science is built up of facts, as a house is with stones. But a collection of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.” – Henri Poincare At the AGU Fall …

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December 28, 2015

The Magic Ingredient for Linking Climate Resources to Community Resilience? It Might be Trust.

The Magic Ingredient for Linking Climate Resources to Community Resilience? It Might be Trust.

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Lindsay Barbieri, PhD Student, Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources, University of Vermont Regardless if you are engaging on the resource side or the community side, trust plays a critical role in building climate resilience. At this year’s AGU Fall Meeting, I attended a season on “Evolving the US Climate Resilience Toolkit to Support a …

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December 23, 2015

What Does it Mean to Be a Geoscientist?

Female scientist

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Emily Parker, Ph.D. student in environmental engineering, University of California, Irvine What does it mean to be a geoscientist? I did not know it was a question that needed answering – I thought it was a well-defined occupation. After attending an AGU Fall Meeting session focused specifically on what being a geoscientist means, however, …

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December 22, 2015

Antarctic Proposals Worthy of Jules Verne

Sea Ice in the Bellingshausen Sea

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Andrea Stevens, Graduate Student, University of Arizona I couldn’t help wishing Jules Verne was sitting next to me this morning as the future directions of Antarctic research were laid bare in the halls of the Moscone Center at the AGU Fall meeting. From science-fiction looking gadgets and imaginative project proposals to an international cohort …

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December 21, 2015

From Flood Research to Resilience Mapping

USGS map

Today’s post is part of a series written by student bloggers from the AGU Fall Meeting. By: Jiawei Tao, Peking University Nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population resides in its coastal counties. A detailed analysis on different types of hazards (floods, heavy storms, storm surge, etc.) and some long-term effects (such as sea level rise) are of vital importance in estimating vulnerability and potential impacts in the near-term as well …

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December 17, 2015

Friend or Foe of Science? The FY 2016 Omnibus Appropriations Bill

Friend or Foe of Science? The FY 2016 Omnibus Appropriations Bill

It’s the most wonderful time of the year – and in the spirit of giving, Congress just released an enormous $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the entire federal government for fiscal year 2016 (FY16).  Since October 1st, when the fiscal year officially started, the federal government has been funded by a series of temporary funding bills – called continuing resolutions (CRs) – to give Congress time to compromise on …

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December 1, 2015

National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan

National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan

This blog post was written by Delores Knipp, Editor in Chief of AGU’s Space Weather Journal. When one thinks of the kinds of weather that might grab headlines or be worthy of policy considerations, terms like polar vortices, fire weather, super-typhoons and El Nino come to mind.  “Space Weather,” which refers to variations in the space environment between the sun and Earth (and throughout the solar system) that can affect …

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