May 14, 2015

Making My CASE

The author in DC

This blog post was written by Annie Putman, a Ph.D. student in the Geology and Geophysics Department at the University of Utah. Once the excitement of receiving my acceptance from AGU to attend the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering (CASE) Workshop in Washington subsided, I faced up to the next hurdle: a trip to the mall to supplement the flannels in my …

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April 30, 2015

Ruptured Science and Policy: The Nepal Earthquake

Earthquake damage

Geologists have long recognized the potential for a catastrophic earthquake in Nepal. After all, the Himalayas are icy, saw-toothed proof of the power of the region’s tectonic processes. The range is one of the fastest-growing mountain belts in the world, the result of roughly 50 million years of collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. But the true impact of last Saturday’s magnitude-7.8 earthquake goes beyond geology. The epicenter was …

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January 26, 2015

The State of the Climate, According to Obama

White House

On Tuesday night, the president carried on the time-honored tradition of appearing before Congress and delivering the State of the Union address. So what exactly did he say? The President spent a full two minutes discussing the topic of climate change, which is pretty lengthy considering the totality of individual issues mentioned in a typical SOTU address. Notably, the president called out United States leadership in combating climate change: “In …

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January 15, 2015

Top Five Science Policy Issues in 2015

Top Five Science Policy Issues in 2015

Earlier this week, we took look at the top five science policy issues of 2014. Now comes the fun part – reading the tea leaves in search of what we think will be the top five science policy issues going forward. Some will be trends carried over from the year previous, and some will be entirely new.

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January 12, 2015

Top 5 Science Policy Stories of 2014

Top 5 Science Policy Stories of 2014

From “secret science” and “I’m not a scientist” to executive actions and appropriations, 2014 was packed with a variety of science policy news. In a year chockfull of ups, downs, twists, and turns, AGU Public Affairs combed through the news clippings, emails, and tweets to compile a list of our top five Earth and space science policy stories from 2014.

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December 18, 2014

SIPS Ahoy, AGU ReLaunches Focus Group

SIPS Ahoy, AGU ReLaunches Focus Group

The Societal Impacts and Policy Sciences (SIPS) Focus Group of AGU is casting off any impediments that may have kept us below the sonar, radar or lidar of the AGU membership at the 2014 Fall Meeting in San Francisco. We invite attendees to participate in a SIPS Lunch and Relaunch Event on Thursday, December 18 to discuss the objectives and activities of SIPS. The group was established in 2008, but has a revised name and an updated webpage, so the Fall Meeting is an opportune time for a meet, greet and critique.

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December 12, 2014

FY15 Omnibus – A Close Shave

For the past several months those inside the beltway have nervously watched with bated breath as House and Senate appropriators quietly negotiated a spending bill that funds the government through the remainder of fiscal year 2015 (FY15). Late Tuesday night, the long-awaited bill was unveiled.

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December 11, 2014

Scientific Known Unknowns and Uncertainties: Vital Information or Achilles Heel?

Scientific Known Unknowns and Uncertainties: Vital Information or Achilles Heel?

Scientists are in the business of producing knowledge. In the process we delineate what is known, what is uncertain, and what is unknown. But for much of the general public, the unknown and the uncertain implies doubt.

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December 3, 2014

Defending Science @ Fall Meeting

Defending Science @ Fall Meeting

In recent years, a small but growing number of climate scientists have found themselves the targets of politically motivated groups. The Climate Science Legal Defense Fund (CSLDF) was founded in 2011 by Scott Mandia and Joshua Wolfe to protect the scientific endeavor by providing legal assistance to climate scientists facing such attacks.

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November 21, 2014

Duck Season Now Open. What’s in Congress’ Sights?

Duck Season Now Open. What's in Congress' Sights?

The 113th Congress returned to session last week after the mid-term elections. Democrats are seeking to compromise while they still have leadership of the Senate, and Republicans want to tie up loose ends to make room for more ambitious legislation in the 114th Congress when they take control of both chambers. The hope is that the lame duck Congress will be productive in passing fiscal year 2015 (FY15) appropriations, confirming nominees for administrative posts, and selecting party leadership positions for congressional committees.

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